The best breads for kids- Chewsday Reviews

Chewsday Review- Tip Top The One wholemeal

Today's review is similar to last week, but this time I'm looking at wholemeal, wholegrain and multigrain bread. So what's the difference between these three breads? 

 

Wholemeal bread is made from wholegrains that have been ground into a finer texture, BUT this is often mixed together with white flour (without the wholegrain). This means the fibre content will vary between brands, depending on how much white flour they add.

 

Wholegrain bread is made from the whole grain, and often has a slightly rougher or denser texture than wholemeal. This is likely the highest fibre bread and most nutritious, but can be a texture that some kiddies find tricky. 

 

Multigrain bread is white bread with the seeds mixed back in. This means that the fibre content also varies between brands.  

 

So what have I chosen? Tip Top The One wholemeal. Lots of the benefits are similar to last week's white bread review!

🔶Ingredients: 

🔹Wholemeal wheat flour, water, wheat flour, baker's yeast, wheat gluten, wheat fibre, vinegar, canola oil. Iodised salt, soy flour, vegetable gum, emulsifiers, minerals (iron, zinc), vitamins (vitamin E, niacin, B6, thiamin, folic acid).

🔹The wholemeal wheat flour makes up 38% of this product. You can see some white flour has been added too, along with extra fibre. This is likely to create the texture associated with Tip Top bread. 

🔹Common allergens include: wheat, gluten, soy

 

🔶The positives: 

🔹Excellent fibre content at 8.5g per 100g, which is 3.1g per sandwich slice. This is higher than almost all of the breads on the market. Toddlers need about 14g of fibre per day, meaning that 2 slices provide about 44% of requirements. 

🔹Low fat, saturated fat and sugar content (and no added sugar!)

🔹Reasonably priced at $3 per loaf, which works out to about 16c a slice. 

🔹Added iron, which is a benefit for kids with very limited diets. The amount in this bread is not as well absorbed as iron from meat, but 2 slices meets about 17% of a toddler's iron needs. 

🔹Reasonably high protein content at 9.7%. Remember though that most Australian kids eat more protein than they actually need. 

 

🔶The negatives:

🔹390mg of sodium (salt) per 100g, which puts it at the higher end of the healthy guidelines for sodium. Bread is traditionally a higher salt product, and finding a low salt option is particularly difficult. Compared to other wholemeal/wholegrain/multigrain breads, this product has one of the lower sodium contents. 

 

🔶The marketing:

🔹"Softer than ever" which is definitely a benefit for texture sensitive kiddies

🔹4.5/5 stars in the health start rating (this system is flawed, but I think the rating is appropriate here

🔹"Vitamins and minerals" Yes, the addition of iron is potentially beneficial, as is the mix of B vitamins. However, for kids eating a varied diet, these aren't really necessary.

 

🔶The alternatives:

🔹This is a great wholemeal option for kids (and adults!) If you have a child who is accepting of the texture of wholegrain bread then feel free to stick with that!

🔹If you prefer other brands, aim for a fibre content of more than 6g of fibre per 100g, and less than 400mg of sodium per 100g. 

 

Chewsday Review- Wonder White Hi Fibre Bread

Today's review was something I moved to the front of the Chewsday queue, because I thought it was such a good idea! For some of the kids I work with, this is their only safe food, and something they eat at most meals. Can you guess? Yep, it's white bread! 'Fussy' kids love white bread because of its soft texture, lack of bumps/bits/seeds, consistent taste, white colour and unchanging appearance. Now, it's easy to write white bread off as a 'refined junk' but for some of my clients this is a staple. And white bread has come a long way! No judgement please- wholemeal and mixed grain may be better choices overall, but for some families it's just not an option. Today's bread of Chewsday choice is Wonder White Hi Fibre + Vitamins & Minerals

 

 

🔶Ingredients: 

🔹Unbleached wheat flour, water, WonderFibreTM blend, yeast, vinegar, canola oil, iodised salt, wheat gluten, acacia gum, cultured wheat flour, soy flour, vegetable emulsifiers, vitamins (niacin, vitamin E, thiamin, B6, folic acid), minerals (iron, zinc)

🔹The fibre mix is a combination of insoluble fibre, soluble fibre and resistant starch. Each type of these fibres plays a different beneficial role in the body. 

🔹Common allergens include: wheat, gluten, soy

 

🔶The positives: 

🔹Excellent fibre content at 7.8g per 100g, which is 2.9g per slice. This is more than many wholemeal varieties and equivalent to some multigrain breads. Toddlers need about 14g of fibre per day, meaning that 2 slices provide about 41% of requirements. 

🔹Low fat, saturated fat and sugar content (and no added sugar!)

🔹Reasonably priced at $3 per loaf, which works out to about 16c a slice. 

🔹Added iron, which is a benefit for kids with very limited diets. The amount in this bread is not as well absorbed as iron from meat, but 2 slices meets about 17% of a toddler's iron needs. 

🔹Reasonably high protein content at 7.8%. Remember though that most Australian kids eat more protein than they actually need. 

 

🔶The negatives:

🔹400mg of sodium (salt) per 100g, which puts it at the higher end of the healthy guidelines for sodium. Bread is traditionally I higher salt product, and finding a low salt option is particularly difficult. Compared to other white breads, this product has one of the lower sodium contents. 

 

🔶The marketing:

🔹"High in fibre" and I'm very happy to pay that claim!

🔹"Vitamins and minerals" Yes, the addition of iron is potentially beneficial, as is the mix of B vitamins. However, for kids eating a varied diet, these aren't really necessary. 

🔹"Source of protein" True, but I wouldn't have thought this was a big selling point for bread. 

 

🔶The alternatives:

🔹If your child likes multigrain bread, then stick with that. It has all the fibre and the health benefits of eating the wholegrain. 

🔹If you have a child who is VERY specific about the bread they'll accept, then I think this is a great white bread option! See if you can switch between the high fibre brands regularly to stop them jagging on one brand/packaging/taste. 

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